Bicarbonate

EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid)

Uric Acid

Vitamin A (Retinol)

LDH (Lactate Dehydrogenase)

Creatinine

DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid)

GGT (Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase)

TPO Ab (Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies)

BUN/Creatinine Ratio

HDL Cholesterol

Bilirubin (Total and Direct)

Copper Serum

Immature Granulocytes

Ceruloplasmin

Hemoglobin A1C

Lactic Acid

Glucose

Free T4 (Thyroxine)

RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width)

BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen)

RBC (Red Blood Cell Count)

DHEA-S (Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate)

NRBC (Nucleated Red Blood Cells)

Total Cholesterol

Hemoglobin

Platelet Count

Serum Cortisol

HOMA-IR (Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance)

Chloride

ANA (Antinuclear Antibody)

IGF-1 (Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1)

ALT (Alanine Aminotransferase)

LDL Particle Size

Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

IL-6 (Interleukin-6)

Sed Rate (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate)

AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)

Fasting Insulin

Phosphorous

Optimize longevity by monitoring Total Cholesterol levels. Learn how this biomarker influences overall health and its impact on aging and longevity.

Total Cholesterol

Total cholesterol is a crucial biomarker used to assess an individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease, a major contributor to premature mortality. High levels of total cholesterol, particularly low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, are associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Longevity experts utilize total cholesterol measurements to guide interventions that promote heart health and ultimately extend lifespan. By closely monitoring and managing total cholesterol levels through lifestyle modifications and medication when necessary, individuals can significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular events and improve their chances of living a longer and healthier life.

Biomarker Explained

Total cholesterol is a critical biomarker in assessing an individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease, which is a leading cause of premature mortality. Elevated levels of total cholesterol, particularly low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, are linked to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. As longevity experts, we use total cholesterol measurements to guide interventions aimed at promoting heart health and ultimately extending lifespan. When interpreting total cholesterol levels, it is important to consider the recommended values set by medical guidelines. For example, the American Heart Association recommends that total cholesterol levels should ideally be less than 200 milligrams per deciliter. Additionally, it is crucial to assess the ratio of low-density lipoprotein to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as this provides a more comprehensive picture of cardiovascular risk. Based on these measurements, we can then develop personalized interventions to manage total cholesterol levels. Lifestyle modifications, such as adopting a heart-healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and quitting smoking, are fundamental components of reducing total cholesterol. In cases where lifestyle changes alone are insufficient, medication may be necessary to lower cholesterol levels and mitigate cardiovascular risk. By closely monitoring and managing total cholesterol levels, individuals can significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular events and improve their prospects for a longer and healthier life. Furthermore, regular monitoring of total cholesterol levels allows for the early detection of cardiovascular risk and provides an opportunity for timely intervention to promote longevity.

Keywords:

Total cholesterol, cardiovascular disease risk, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, American Heart Association guidelines, lifestyle modifications, medication intervention

Complete Patient Intake Form

Continue Browsing Our Offers