UIBC (Unsaturated Iron Binding Capacity)

MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume)

Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)]

Hemoglobin A1C

Copper Serum

RBC (Red Blood Cell Count)

Vitamin A (Retinol)

eGFR (Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate)

ApoA/ApoB Ratio

Lymphocytes (Absolute)

Serum Cortisol

LDL Cholesterol (calculated)

BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen)

TIBC (Total Iron Binding Capacity)

IGF-1 (Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1)

Glucose

HS-CRP (High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein)

Monocytes (Absolute)

LDL Particle Size

Free T4 (Thyroxine)

Hematocrit

Fasting Insulin

EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid)

Serum Iron

RBC Magnesium

Immature Granulocytes

Bicarbonate

TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone)

ANA (Antinuclear Antibody)

MCHC (Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration)

Platelet Count

Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

Bilirubin (Total and Direct)

Calcium

Eosinophils (Absolute)

AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase)

Neutrophils (Absolute)

Homocysteine

TPO Ab (Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies)

NRBC (Nucleated Red Blood Cells)

Discover the importance of WBC count as a biomarker for longevity. Learn how tracking this biomarker can indicate overall health and immune system function.

WBC (White Blood Cell Count)

WBC (White Blood Cell Count) is a commonly used biomarker in longevity research. It serves as an important indicator of overall immune health and systemic inflammation, both of which play crucial roles in the aging process. A higher WBC count may suggest chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress, which are associated with age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Monitoring WBC levels over time can provide valuable insights into an individual’s immune status and overall health trajectory. However, it’s important to consider other factors such as age, gender, and underlying health conditions when interpreting WBC results for longevity purposes.

Biomarker Explained

White Blood Cell Count (WBC) is a crucial biomarker for longevity research due to its association with immune health and systemic inflammation. Elevated WBC levels may indicate chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress, both of which are linked to age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, monitoring WBC levels over time can provide valuable insights into an individual’s immune status and overall health trajectory. However, it is important to consider other factors such as age, gender, and underlying health conditions when interpreting WBC results for longevity purposes. By taking these factors into account, researchers and healthcare professionals can more accurately assess an individual’s risk for age-related diseases and tailor intervention strategies to promote healthy aging.

Keywords:

White Blood Cell Count, WBC, immune health, systemic inflammation, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, age-related diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, biomarker, longevity research, health trajectory, intervention strategies, healthy aging.

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